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Personal Branding Guide for Designers

 Personal branding is the practice of people marketing themselves and their careers as brands. Being good at your craft is not enough these days, being unique and authentic will make the cut, but only if enough people know about you. As Michael Simmons writes, authenticity is key in the digital age. Having a strong personal brand and following can lead to enormous opportunities and recognition.

Personal branding is becoming one of the most important key factors in any industry. Skills and boring resumes are not guaranteeing you anything anymore. You have to really start developing your own brand and building a tribe, or in other words an audience that will help you getting jobs, supporting you, sharing your work and getting recognition.

In today’s article I’d like to share some personal branding guidelines I’ve been experimenting with in the last couple of years. The techniques and methods used led me to speaking engagements, interviews on Forbes and Fast Company, business growth and business leads, not to mention the connections and friendships I’ve made.

Why should you care about building

Tips For Make Dropdown Menus

 In this guide I’ll cover a handful of design techniques for building usable dropdown navigation menus. This includes multi-level dropdowns and mega menus which all rely on the same core design principles.

Markers For Sub-Menus

It’s a good idea to include markers for links that have sub-menus attached. These small visual indicators let users know where links are placed and how to access them.

And these rules apply to all menus whether you’re designing with 1 tier or 4 tiers of links.

Markers can range from arrows to dots or squares or anything noticeable. Most users are smart enough to pick up what the symbol means, so long as it’s universal.

The Threadbird navigation is a fantastic example of this effect in action.

Some of their links have sub-menus while others don’t. In fact some of their links have sub-sub-menus which you can only discern by their unique marker next to each link.

Threadbird uses the right-pointing double angle quotation mark, simplified to raquo. Web designers prefer this symbol over a single arrow because it’s bulkier and easier to notice at a distance.

6 Missing Features in Your Web Design

 At the end of the day your audience will be attracted to modern design, elements they sub-consciously accept as the norm, because they’ve had that user-experience on other websites. Think of modern design as a combination of art, design, and functionality. When these elements ‘work’ in harmony your page will be undeniable and ultimately guide the visitor to where you want them to be.

So, ‘What’s Missing’?

1. Web Design That’s not Unique to Your Industry & Brand

Your web design is the first impression a visitor will have about the business. This page should not only be reflective of your industry, products or services, but it should stand out from competition and reflect your company culture. The Following should be considered:

  • Design should attract and imprint in the memory of your visitors to create “awareness”
  • Content should create a narrative to ‘tell your story’ through the website.

Make sure that your web design is unique and recognizable. Distinct visual approach & style, typography and interactive design elements play a big role in this department. All this creates the first impression in your visitor’s head and

5 Common Mistakes on The Web Design

Designing an interaction has never been easy. It involves deep analysis of user behavior and meticulous planning. With new technologies and interaction design patterns emerging, things are not getting easier.Users are harder to impress with glossy images, smooth hover effects and unexpected animations, but the dilemma remains the same — how can you create a delightful user experience that generates conversions along with users’ smiles? If you’re aware of common design pitfalls, you’re far less likely to make them.

To make it easier for you — and perhaps to let you know that you’re not alone — here is a roundup of the most common interaction design misconceptions.

1. Overwhelmed with Innovation

Web designers are a creative lot. We want to express ourselves through our work. We’re always looking for innovative ways to make designs stand out. However, when it comes to IxD, innovation doesn’t always work for good. It might even be bad for your site. Users crave familiarity and often they are tuned in to certain ways of operation.

Randy J. Hunt, Etsy’s Creative Director and author of Product Design for the Web, put it clearly: “Hey, designers: stop trying to be so damned clever.” In this article, he explains

7 Pro Tips to a Smarter Design Process

Being a UX designer myself, its important that we fall back in love with the art of design. Especially when you hit a creative wall.

The reasons vary. Maybe youve been working too fast and too hard and burnt out. Maybe you work in a non-creative environment and contend with a lot of resistance each day. Maybe youve unknowingly become a repeat performer, putting out the same work over and over again. Or maybe youre just bored.

Your process should never be so ideal that it cant change. Every project has limitations. Whether it’s resources or skills, your design process must adapt to all these real-life constraints.

Heres 7 tips for improving your own design process based on what I’ve experienced in my own career.

1. Define the problem before hunting for solutions

Einstein once said, If I had an hour to solve a problem I’d spend 55 minutes thinking about the problem and 5 minutes thinking about solutions.

Many designers make a fatal flaw in thinking problems are obvious. Most of the time obvious problems are merely

7 Ways to Supercharge Your Design Learning

I started learning design in 2007, and a lot has changed since then. Now we have thousands of communities available, tutorial sites, remarkable individuals sharing their knowledge and dozens of opportunities to learn and earn as a designer.

Today, I’d like to share some of the techniques and methods I’ve used to learn design. I keep learning new things every day and some of the examples below are based on my personal experience trying, failing, building and succeeding.

1 Percent Rule

Practicing everyday is what makes you better. The trick is to really commit to learning, set aside some time and show up consistently every day. Just think about simple math, showing up 60 minutes a day for a month is 60 minutes x 30 days = 1,800 min or 30 hours, which is quite a lot of time to learn something. According to James Clear, becoming better just by 1 percent every day will make a huge impact on your progress in just a year, see the graph below to better understand the power you can use to supercharge your learning.

Instead of practicing the same thing over and over again, try to

Tips to Use Color in Web Design

The current landscape of color in website design is interesting to think about. Most websites look more or less the same, yet color can be a powerful tool in design.

I’m not trying to state this as anything revolutionary or as an extraordinary find. But if most websites have similar color schemes, what does that mean for color? Actually, it means a lot. Imagine a world where every website was colorful – it would possibly be very pretty and rainbow-filled but it would mean that nothing stood out. It’s like having every paragraph bolded in your essay.

Therefore, when color schemes are muted, it allows for many opportunities.

Draw Attention to Anything You Want

Most websites start with a basic grayscale look – white background and black text. Color comes in as accents that get you to look places. That’s why websites are not filled with color – they use it to get you to look at the buttons, headlines or links.

Take Vibrant, for instance, when you first land on their home page the background and images are black and white. The logo, call to action and the hamburger menu are bright

7 Web Design Trends for 2016

The new year will come with plenty of new techniques and trends, but the dominant theme is likely to be a continuation of things we have started to see at the end of 2015. More video, vertical patterns, Material Design-inspired interfaces and slide-style sites will grow in popularity.

And it’s not hard for you to make the most of these concepts. Here, we’ll ring in the new year with 11 web design trends (and plenty of great examples) that designers will be seeing a lot of in 2016. (Make sure to click the links as well and play around with some of these sites to really get a feel for them. Many of the trends are just as much in the user interface as the visuals.)

2016 Web Design Trends

Vertical Patterns and Scrolling

A bigger leaning toward mobile – with some thinking mobile traffic could equal desktop traffic this year – means more sites are being designed with vertical user flows.

A few years ago, we were all debating the end of the scroll in web design only to find it roaring back as an important inzeraction tool. Smaller screens lead users

Tips to Create Perfect Color Combinations

One of the most challenging and tricky parts of the design process can be choosing a color palette that represents your brand or message, while creating an amazing base for the design.

Creating perfect color combinations is more than just picking two colors and running with it. There’s actually quite a bit of science and design color theory behind it. Today, we’ll look at nine ways to help you create a more perfect color palette. (And of course, the tips come with a showcase of websites featuring beautiful color combinations.)

Start with the Color Wheel

Do you remember the color wheel from school as a child? It’s still a practical tool as an adult.

The color wheel can help you think about color and how different hues relate to one another. It’s a practical way to determine whether a pair (or more) of colors will relate to one another in a harmonious way.

The wheel contains primary, secondary and tertiary colors and every combination therein.

  • Primary colors: Red, Yellow, blue
  • Secondary colors: Green, purple, orange (mix of two primary colors)
  • Tertiary colors: Azure, violet, rose, red-orange, chartreuse, spring green (mix of a primary and

Tips to Start a Web Design Project

There’s a first time for everything — and it’s finally time for your very first web design project! While landing your first gig is a huge accomplishment in itself, keeping your first client happy requires a whole different set of skills. You’re not just a designer — you’re a project manager, and offering a great customer service experience is essential for winning over your clients’ repeat business, so you’ll need to be on target from day one.

But where should you begin? You may not have learned so much project management in school, so we’d like to offer up a few tips. The infographic below outlines every stage of the web design process from start to finish. The first step of a web design project is learning what your client wants: her overall objectives, the purpose of the website, her audience, the features she requires. Remember, this is her project, not yours. You’re here to bring her vision to life — and hopefully, to offer some creative insights that will make the website even better than she imagined.

You’ll need to know your client’s goals up front, because that’s how you’ll determine budget. Next, outline budget and timeline

Tips and Tools for Designers

The task of prototyping a website is an extensive process of creating a basic wireframe with interactive features. While a wireframe may be static images or sketches, a prototype is often interactive with functionality for all the major pages.

Graphic editing programs have always been the most popular choice for prototyping. But in recent years more developers are switching to in-browser prototyping. It’s much faster, cleaner, and simpler when constructing a brand new project. But how do you get started?

In this post I’d like to cover the basics of prototyping in the browser and give you some tools to help you along the way.

Basics of In-Browser Prototyping

Websites can be described as digital interfaces built to run in a web browser. Many designers like to create these interfaces in graphics editors before moving on to coding.

But it makes more sense to prototype websites in a browser to see how each feature works, and to gauge initial concepts like layout structure and page animations.

There is no single best way to prototype although most designers have their own routines for getting started on a new project. Many designers still prefer

What is an Interaction Designer?

Interaction design is a process in which designers focus on creating engaging web interfaces with logical and thought out behaviors and actions. Successful interactive design uses technology and principles of good communication to create desired user experiences.

Interaction design in terms of websites and apps is something we have been talking about for 10 years or so, but those bigger conversations and much never. One of the best and most cited introductions to the concept was published by Bob Baxley in 2002 in a 12-part series that defined interaction design for web applications.

“Introducing Interaction Design” breaks the field into five pieces that are still useful and relevant today:

  • Human/machine communication is the translation of conversations between the device and user.
  • Action/reaction looks at how interactions happen and unfold.
  • State ensures that users know what is happening and why in terms of the application.
  • Workflow ensures that users know who to use a tool or application and what happens next.
  • Malfunction takes into account mistakes that are bound to happen.

Further, there are certain considerations to keep in mind when creating design interactions. offers basic questions in six different categories that can help shape how the design

Everything You Need to Know About Virtual Reality and Web Design

How will the web look in virtual reality?

The 2D web could become immersive, interactive and tangible. Imagine Wikipedia as an extensive multimedia library. Instead of reading about the Egyptian pyramids, you could wander around them, explore the inside of the pyramids, view the texture of blocks used to build it or solve a puzzle to gain access to the pharaoh’s tomb. You could even have a virtual guide accompanying you, narrating the history of the pyramids and answering questions. And all this while being accompanied by distinct ambient sound effects and sounds.

Not impressed?

What about surfing Amazon, searching for the ultimate wedding dress? You could try them on, see yourself from a 3D perspective. You could create multiple avatars to compare several dresses to could choose the one that fits and have it delivered in one day. Visit a virtual car dealer, test-drive the car, select options, tweak the seat position, see if it suits you and … summon it (Hello Tesla!). Science fiction? Twenty years ago, shopping on the internet was science fiction. Twenty years ago, the idea that you couldwatch the Olympic Games on your VR headset was equivalent to

Web Design Trends For “Start Here” Pages

When visitors land on a new website they usually have no idea where to begin. They usually just look around for nav links that might provide the info they’re looking for. But the newest trend of the “start here” page offers a much better experience.

Brand new users on your site should be inspired to keep browsing deeper into your posts. The best way to achieve this is with a single unified intro page featuring links, a small guide to the site, and even some background about yourself & the site’s history.

In this post I’ll look into the trend of start here pages to see what they offer and how you can take advantage of them in your own projects.

Introduce Your Website

The biggest reason to use a “start here” page is to introduce new visitors to your website. Since each site offers something different the “start here” pages will have a different goal based on content.

Your page should share vital information and aim to educate visitors about the site. But it should also drive visitors further into the site by sharing the best resources and links to get started.

Designer’s Guide to Promoting Yourself

You can be the most creative and productive designer in the world, but it doesn’t mean anything without paid work. Designers can rely on repeat clients but it’s important to keep meeting new potential clients and building future relationships.

In this post I’d like to share tips and strategies for getting your work out there into the eyes of clients and other designers. There is no one best method to use, and in fact you should employ multiple strategies to garner the largest reach possible.

But make a game plan and learn why self-promotion is so important. Through practice it’ll become a lot easier like second nature.

It All Starts With A Portfolio

This should be obvious but I’m surprised how many designers have a weak portfolio of work, or even worse nothing at all.

Everyone uses the Internet and there’s no reason to believe this is slowing down.

If you do any digital work then you should have an online portfolio. This includes all creative jobs whether you’re an icon designer, web designer, digital artist, motion graphics designer, or anything similar. And this doesn’t mean that you need a custom website

5 Ways Creative Web Designers Work

An awesome website created by a talented and creative web designer is a thing to behold. Websites like these, set the bar so high that even approaching that level of craftsmanship seems out of reach. It sometimes seems that this task requires a level of creativity we have yet to achieve.

Like many other things in life, it’s doable. It may take years of training, and involve a fair share of sweat and tears but, — it is doable.

Yet, there are ways that you can reach that level of craftsmanship more quickly. And one of them is with the help of a state of the art creative design tool like this highly flexible WordPress theme.

Let’s see how creative web designers work their magic

What are some of the key characteristics top-tier creative designers have in common? Here are five of the more common ones:

1. They work with concepts – and not just with design techniques

Coming up with great conceptual designs takes research, experience, and digging into what other creatives achieved. Success comes when you are able to take a concept, and bend it into something that offers a realistic solution to a client’s brief.

This visual concept was

Why Designers and Web Developers Must Work Together

It seems like a common sense idea: Designers and developers must work together.

But too often, these individuals work apart while working on the very same project. The designer works to create elements and color palettes and typography that looks great, while the developer codes and prepares the material for web publishing. And this can cause discord between the designer and web developer and in the final design itself.

If designers and developers work together on projects from start to finish, the result is a more cohesive web project with great aesthetics, user interface and clean code. There is less work and rework during the collaborative process, hopefully resulting in a project that can be completed in less time.

Designer vs. Developer

Traditionally web designers and we developers have been separate job titles.

Typically web designers use graphic design software such as Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator to create what websites and elements will look like. This aesthetic is then coded using HTML, Javascript, jQuery, CSS and other programming languages by a web developer to make everything work on the web.

While designers and developers may often work from separate rooms or even

Design Trends For Modal Windows

Modal windows are those popup windows that appear over the screen rather than opening a new tab/window. They usually darken the background to bring attention to the popup.

Most websites running modal windows add some type of call to action whether it’s a button or a form or something. But it can also be a simple message about browser features like disabled JavaScript or an adblock extension.

Everything in the window takes precedence over the page so these modals are meant to draw attention. They can be annoying and outright infuriating but numbers don’t lie:they work.

Let’s delve a bit into current trends of modal windows to see how they work and why you’d use them.

Dark Backgrounds & Clickable Areas

Modal windows follow a similar design strategy and they’re not very complicated.

They mostly all use a darkened background on the page to bring attention to the modal content. This shouldn’t be a pitch black background because that can feel intimidating.

Instead the user should see a touch of the page behind the background, but it should have a reduced opacity. This could be 90% or 50% depending on how

5 Tips on Hiring the Best Web Designer

Hiring a web design can be an exciting process. When I talk about hiring a web design in this post, the advice can be applied in a variety of ways. First, it could mean hiring a single, usually freelance, designer for a job you need to be done. It could also refer to a web design agency.

Additionally, it could be advice for hiring a web designer for your own team. The advice is valuable for web designers who are looking to improve their portfolio. Now, let’s discuss five different but important things when trying to hire a web designer.

The work shows off responsive design

It’s still surprising how many times responsive designs don’t make it into a web designer portfolio. It’s hard to say if a designer is capable of delivering responsive design if it’s not there. It could be omitted by mistake or because they have never done it. You can’t tell if it’s not there. Now, this guide refers to a web designer.

The web is a flexible medium that works on the tiniest devices and their tiny screens to larger devices and their larger screens. It’s important for any

Tips To Create a Web Design Style Guide

Creating websites is getting more and more complex and is usually not a one person job. It is important to ensure that design is consistent and optimized to meet business objectives and create enjoyable experiences for users.

One of the ways to ensure that team is on the same page when designing separate parts of the website or saving designs from developers is to create design documentation or a web design style guide.

It is beneficial to have a style guide in order to create a cohesive experience among different pages. Also it helps to ensure that future development or third-party production will follow brand guidelines and will be perceived as part of the overall brand.

Luke Clum has touched the surface of using style guides as your first step in web design last year and I would like to take a more in-depth look on how to create a usable web design style guide for your projects.

What is a Style Guide?

A style guide is a collection of pre-designed elements, graphics and rules designers or developers should follow to ensure that separate website pieces will be consistent and will create a